Law Enforcement
Forecasting Group

LEFG Members

 
Frederick Bealefeld

Frederick Bealefeld

In June 2014, Mr. Frederick H. Bealefeld III joined Under Armour (UA) as a vice president and the chief global security officer. He is responsible for the development, implementation, and oversight of all global security efforts, including personal security for UA teammates, the facility, and asset protection. Mr. Bealefeld was appointed Police Commissioner of the city of
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Baltimore, Maryland, on November 20, 2007, and commanded the eighth-largest municipal police agency in the United States until his retirement in 2012. With over three decades of service to the Baltimore Police Department, Mr. Bealefeld is credited with reducing city homicides and violent crime to their lowest levels since the 1970s. In his time as Police Commissioner, he redefined the city’s crime-fighting strategy by focusing enforcement efforts on violent offenders and fostering improved relationships between police and the community. Most known for his achievements in reducing overall gun violence, Mr. Bealefeld is responsible for double-digit declines in gun crime and was instrumental in the creation of Baltimore’s gun offender registry and legislative advocacy efforts for tougher penalties for gun offenders. He received national recognition for overhauling the manner in which the department investigates cases of sexual assault, uncovering the largest police corruption scandal in the agency’s history, and personally conducting the arrests of those officers with the assistance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

 

In 2011, Mr. Bealefeld was profiled by CNN White House Correspondent Dan Lothian for developing a citywide campaign to stem the flow of illegal guns into Baltimore and reducing city homicides to their lowest point in 30 years. He was also featured in a cover story by Governing magazine for his integration of technology into the crime fight. He is listed as one of the “Most Influential Marylanders” by the Daily Record newspaper, and his work as a police executive has been profiled on a national level by media outlets such as CNN, CBS News, the Associated Press, The New York Times, and The Christian Science Monitor.

 

Mr. Bealefeld served on the faculty of Stevenson University, teaching undergraduate study in criminal justice. He also assisted in the development of a Criminal Justice Center and has worked as a private consultant for police agencies, universities, and schools in areas of violence prevention, police operations, and organizational integrity. Mr. Bealefeld has served on numerous law enforcement advisory committees for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the Police Executive Research Forum, the Major Cities Chiefs Association, and the U.S. Department of Justice.

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John Bilich

John Bilich

John Bilich is the First Deputy Chief Security Officer at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and is tasked with assisting the Chief Security Officer with overseeing the agency’s critical security functions to provide the highest-quality public safety, facility security operations, security program management, emergency management, and airport rescue and
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firefighting training. Mr. Bilich’s experience includes a 24-year career with the New York City Police Department (NYPD). In his last position with the NYPD, Deputy Commissioner of Operations, he served as the agency’s primary crime strategist and leader of the department’s CompStat program. Upon his retirement, Mr. Bilich joined the New York State Division of Criminal Justice as Deputy Commissioner for Public Safety. In that capacity, he managed the Operation IMPACT program, which was designed to reduce crime in the 17 counties that possessed 80 percent of non-New York City crime.

 

Mr. Bilich has also served as Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance’s Chief Investigator and, most recently, as Brooklyn District Attorney Kenneth Thompson’s Chief Investigator.

 

Mr. Bilich has a bachelor of arts degree from St. Joseph’s College in Brooklyn, New York.

 

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Tom Casady

Tom Casady

Tom Casady is the Public Safety Director in Lincoln, Nebraska, and is responsible for police, fire, emergency medical services, and public safety communications services. In 2011, prior to his appointment as Public Safety Director, he served as Lincoln’s Chief of Police for 17 years.
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Mr. Casady’s public safety career began in 1974 as a Lincoln police officer. He served as the Sheriff of Lancaster County, Nebraska, immediately prior to his appointment as Chief of Police.

 

Mr. Casady’s professional activities include being a lifetime member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts and Police Executive Research Forum. Mr. Casady has coordinated several public safety technology projects, focusing on communications, geographic information systems, crime analysis, mobile data, and location-based services. He is a frequent presenter at national and international conferences on these topics.

 

Throughout his career, Mr. Casady has been an advocate for victims of domestic violence and child abuse. He served as the chair of the Nebraska Commission for the Protection of Children and the Lancaster County Child Abuse Investigation Team and as a member of the Nebraska Child Death Review Team. In 1996, he was honored with the Commissioner’s Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for his work as an advocate for victims of child abuse and neglect.

 

Mr. Casady presently chairs Nebraska’s FirstNet Working Group and serves as a board member of the Teammates Mentoring Program, one of the largest such programs in the United States, with over 7,000 matches. Among his numerous awards, Mr. Casady was inducted into the Nebraska Law Enforcement Hall of Fame in 2011.

 

He received a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from the University of Nebraska–Omaha and a master of arts degree in political science from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

 

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Michael Ciminelli

Michael Ciminelli

Michael L. Ciminelli was recently appointed as the Rochester, New York, Chief of Police by Mayor Lovely Warren. Prior to being appointed Chief of Police, he was Deputy Chief of Police for the Administration Bureau, responsible for administrative and support functions,
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including budget development and management, human resources, policy, training, vehicle fleet management, property and evidence, research and evaluation, labor relations, and grant management. His former Rochester Police Department assignments include Commanding Officer of the Special Operations Division, Commander of Patrol Division West, sergeant, homicide investigator, and patrol officer.

 

Chief Ciminelli served as Chief of Police of the Elmira, New York, Police Department from 1996 to 2002. He was also an Assistant District Attorney for the Monroe County District Attorney’s Office from 1988 to 1991. His other professional experience includes serving as a police management consultant and as an on-site assessor for the Commission for Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies and the New York State Law Enforcement Accreditation Program. Chief Ciminelli is a published author, including articles published in the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, The Police Chief, and Law and Order. Chief Ciminelli has extensive training and instruction experience, both professional and academic. He has instructed law enforcement and public safety courses in the state of New York, the state of New Mexico, and at the federal level. He has served as adjunct faculty at George Mason University and Elmira College, teaching upper-level courses in police administration and law.

 

As an attorney admitted to practice law in New York State and the District of Columbia, Chief Ciminelli also served as Deputy Chief Counsel for Operational Law for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). During his time at DEA, Chief Ciminelli also was Chief of the Domestic Criminal Law section and a staff attorney in the International Law section.

 

Chief Ciminelli holds a juris doctor degree, cum laude, from the University of Buffalo Law School. While at law school, Chief Ciminelli was awarded the Birzon Prize in Clinical Legal Studies for demonstrating excellence in the clinical and trial advocacy program by representing indigent prisoners in Attica, New York, and other New York State correctional facilities, including state appeals and federal habeas corpus petitions. He also holds a bachelor of science degree, with high honors, from Rochester Institute of Technology and an associate of applied science degree, with distinction, from Monroe Community College. He is also a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar and is certified as a force analyst by the Force Science Institute.

 

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Cassandra Deck-Brown

Cassandra Deck-Brown

In February 2013, Ms. Cassandra Deck-Brown was selected to lead the Raleigh, North Carolina, Police Department (RPD). Her service as chief caps a departmental career that began in 1987, shortly after she graduated from East Carolina University.

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In February 2013, Ms. Cassandra Deck-Brown was selected to lead the Raleigh, North Carolina, Police Department (RPD). Her service as chief caps a departmental career that began in 1987, shortly after she graduated from East Carolina University.

 

Like other sworn members of the RPD, Chief Deck-Brown’s first assignment after she completed the police academy was to serve as a patrol officer, answering calls and providing other police services from one of the department’s familiar blue-and-white sedans. Between that starting point and her most recent promotion, the chief served in a number of capacities.

 

Chief Deck-Brown worked in crime prevention and as a school violence intervention investigator; investigated cases as a detective; led investigative, administrative, and operational squads as a sergeant; and served as the department’s grants administrator at the rank of lieutenant.

 

Chief Deck-Brown’s responsibilities increased as she rose in rank. As a captain, she led one of the city’s six police districts. As a major, her assignments included command of the Detective Division. And while serving as the department’s deputy chief, she managed a number of critical functions and projects.

 

All along the way, she was a trailblazer, often becoming the first woman or the first African-American in the department to assume a role or obtain a rank. She now shares her experiences as she mentors others, and her interest in the city’s next generation is demonstrated through her support of youth programs, such as the department’s “Charm School.”

 

Throughout her career, Chief Deck-Brown displayed the professionalism and judgment that are now among her hallmarks as a leader. As time progressed, she prepared herself for the opportunities and the challenges that now make up her days, earning a master’s in public administration from North Carolina State University and completing career development studies in various programs.

 

Chief Deck-Brown believes her primary goals as chief of police are summarized by two words found on the badge she shares with every RPD officer: serve and protect.

 

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Scott Decker

Scott Decker

Scott H. Decker is a professor of criminology and criminal justice at Arizona State University (ASU). In 2009, he received the university award for cutting-edge research, and in 2010, he was named a Foundation Professor. Prior to working at ASU, he was a professor of
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criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, where he received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research in 1989 and was named Curators’ Professor in 2001. Professor Decker was named a Fellow of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences in 2007 and was the Hindelang Lecturer at the University at Albany in 2009. In March 2011, he won the Bruce Smith Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. He is the author of 15 books, more than 150 articles and chapters, and more than 100 presentations in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Central America. His research has been funded by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

 

Professor Decker’s primary research focus has been on criminal justice policy, gangs, violence, and the offender’s perspective. Four of his books have won major awards: Life in the Gang: Family, Friends, and Violence (Cambridge University Press, 1996), Burglars on the Job: Streetlife and Residential Burglary (Northeastern University Press, 1994), Lessons From the Inside: Drug Smugglers on Drug Smuggling (Temple, 2008), and European Street Gangs and Troublesome Youth Groups (Alta Mira, 2005).

 

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Kriste Kibbey Etue

Kriste Kibbey Etue

Colonel Kriste Kibbey Etue was appointed to the cabinet-level position of Director of the Michigan State Police by Governor Rick Snyder, effective January 9, 2011. Colonel Etue is the 18th Director in the 98-year history of the department, and she is the department’s first female Director. As Director, Colonel Etue also serves as State Director of Emergency Management and as Michigan’s Homeland Security Director.
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Colonel Etue began her career with the Department of State Police in 1987 as a member of the 101st Trooper Recruit School. The Michigan State Police is a full-service law enforcement organization, with nearly 2,500 enlisted and civilian employees. The agency includes the four bureaus of Field Services, Administrative Services, Specialized Services, and State Services.

 

Prior to her appointment as Director, Colonel Etue served as Deputy Director and Commander of the Administrative Services Bureau for four years. In this capacity, Colonel Etue provided executive direction and leadership to the Office of Behavioral Science; the Departmental Services Division, which includes budget forecasting, budget development, and facility management; the Training and Standards Division; the Human Resources Division; the Public Affairs and Government Relations sections; and the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards.

 

As a captain, Colonel Etue served as commander of the Emergency Management and Homeland Security Division, where she was responsible for the management and administration of statewide emergency management and homeland security programs, planning, and activities. She was one of only six female state emergency management directors in the country.

 

Colonel Etue chairs the Michigan Homeland Protection Board, the Michigan Public Safety Interoperability Board, the Auto Theft Prevention Authority, and the Michigan Intelligence Operations Center Advisory Board. She is also a member of the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards and serves on the Board of Trustees of the Traffic Improvement Association of Michigan. Colonel Etue serves on the Executive Committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and as an Advisor-at-Large to the IACP State and Provincial Division and works to advance the profession of law enforcement.

 

Colonel Etue holds an associate’s degree from Kalamazoo Valley College and is a graduate of the 206th Session of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

 

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George Gascón

George Gascón

George Gascón is the District Attorney for the city and county of San Francisco, California. He has earned a national reputation as a criminal justice visionary who uses evidence-based practices to lower crime and make communities safer. He is the first Latino to hold the office in San Francisco and is the nation’s first police chief to become District Attorney.
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District Attorney Gascón has focused on making San Francisco the safest large city in America by working to implement a modern justice system that focuses on crime prevention, victims, and violent offenders. Throughout his 30-year career in law enforcement, he has successfully lowered crime by taking a surgical approach to crime and offenders and by seeking the right amount of intervention to change behavior and improve public safety. Despite a traditional prosecutor’s interaction with crime being largely reactive, District Attorney Gascón has put significant emphasis and resources into crime prevention. One less crime means one less tragedy and one less victim.

 

Since taking office, District Attorney Gascón has focused staff resources on more serious and violent offenders. In fact, drug prosecutions went from 63 percent of the office’s felony caseload in 2009 to 26 percent in 2013, allowing more resources to be focused on serious and violent crime. This has caused convictions for assault, domestic violence, and robbery to increase. In addition, homicides were down 36 percent in the first six months of 2014, and felony assault, gun, and robbery prosecutions were up 14 percent, 17 percent and 9 percent, respectively, from 2012 to 2013.

 

Looking to find alternatives to incarceration for low-level offenders, District Attorney Gascón created the nation’s first Alternative Sentencing Program to support prosecutors in assessing risk and determining the most appropriate course of action for each case. The goal is to protect victims and the community by addressing offenders’ risk factors in order to break the cycle of crime and reduce recidivism.

 

In addition, District Attorney Gascón launched the Neighborhood Courts and Neighborhood Prosecution Program as a way to keep low-level offenders from entering the criminal justice system. The program takes nonserious cases away from overcrowded courtrooms and into the community, where trained neighborhood stakeholders can ensure that lawbreakers are accountable to victims and the community without criminalizing first-time, low-level offenders.

 

Under District Attorney Gascón’s leadership, San Francisco created the first Sentencing Commission in California, with the goal of reforming sentencing guidelines by applying evidence-based practices to prosecutions.

 

In addition to initiatives aimed at increasing the safety of San Francisco’s communities and reforming California’s criminal justice system, District Attorney Gascón is regarded as a leader in the effort to end the global epidemic of smartphone theft. In June 2013, in partnership with the New York State Attorney General and the Mayor of London, District Attorney Gascón launched the Secure Our Smartphones initiative in response to the growing number of violent smartphone thefts. The coalition now boasts over 300 public safety leaders, consumer advocates, and lawmakers. Since the formation of the coalition, the manufacturers that sell 97 percent of all smartphones sold in the United States have agreed to implement technology that research suggests will end the epidemic of smartphone theft.

 

A former high school dropout, District Attorney Gascón understands the importance of keeping kids in school to reduce violence and prevent crime. In partnership with the San Francisco Unified School District, the District Attorney’s Office has launched innovative programs to reduce truancy, increase mentoring opportunities for youth, and reduce bullying.

 

District Attorney Gascón is also working to address crime underreporting by breaking down cultural and language barriers that prevent victims and witnesses from engaging with law enforcement. He expanded his office’s multilingual Victims Services Unit beyond the Hall of Justice and into community centers in the neighborhoods of Mission, Chinatown, Tenderloin, and Bayview Hunters Point.

 

District Attorney Gascón is a known innovator for his use of technology to prevent and predict crime. He improved the CompStat system at the Los Angeles, California, Police Department and introduced the system to the San Francisco Police Department during his tenure as Police Chief. District Attorney Gascón believes in using well-developed metrics and technology to drive organizational performance and improve public safety He is currently working on launching a version called “DA Stat” to the District Attorney’s Office.

 

District Attorney Gascón’s 30 years in law enforcement have taken him through the ranks of the Los Angeles Police Department, from a patrol officer to Assistant Chief. He was Chief of Police in Mesa, Arizona, and Chief of Police in San Francisco. In addition to his criminal justice work at the local, state, and national levels, District Attorney Gascón has worked on public safety initiatives in Latin America and the Middle East. He is a board member of the Council of State Governments’ Justice Center, a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Executive Institute, and a member of the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government’s Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety.

 

District Attorney Gascón has a juris doctor degree from Western State University College of Law and a bachelor of arts degree in history from California State University–Long Beach.

 

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Janeé Harteau

Janeé Harteau

Chief Janeé Harteau joined the Minneapolis, Minnesota, Police Department (MPD) in 1987 and worked her way through the ranks, beginning as a patrol officer on the street.

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In 2006, she was appointed as the Inspector of the First Precinct, where she worked to formalize the SafeZone collaborative and served as the first president of its board of directors until July of 2009. As the First Precinct Inspector, she was a longtime proponent of strong public/private partnerships to strengthen public safety downtown. Among those partnerships was the creation of the Block E station, the fusion center, and the Downtown Courtwatch program. for which the MPD won an international community-policing award from the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP).

 

Prior to being appointed to Assistant Chief in 2010, she was the Deputy Chief of the Patrol Bureau, where she was responsible for all MPD 9-1-1 response personnel and the department’s emergency services units. In 2012, Chief Harteau was nominated by the mayor and unanimously confirmed by the city council to become the fifty-second and first female Chief of Police in the city’s history.

 

Chief Harteau has been featured in many local and national publications and has received numerous community accolades, including Minnesota Women’s Press “2013 Changemaker” award and the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal “2013 Diversity in Business Award,” and was honored with the Distinguished Alumni Award from St. Mary’s University of Minnesota. With the rollout of MPD 2.0, Chief Harteau is at the forefront of leading organizational change and has often been a keynote speaker at various educational institutions and business, government, and women’s organizations.

 

Chief Harteau is an active member of the Major Cities Chiefs Association and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. In addition, Chief Harteau serves as a member of various boards of directors, including the Police Executive Research Forum, a national law enforcement think tank based in Washington, DC; the YWCA of Minneapolis; Youthlink, a nonprofit that serves homeless youth; and Cornerhouse, which provides resources for and assesses suspected child sexual abuse victims.

 

Chief Harteau holds a master of arts degree in public safety administration and a bachelor’s degree in police science, both from St. Mary’s University of Minnesota. Currently, she trains law enforcement leaders nationally for Northwestern University’s Center for Public Safety and is an assistant professor at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota in the School of Police Science. She is a graduate of the Senior Management Institute of Police in Boston, Massachusetts, and the Northwestern University Center for Public Safety’s Police Staff and Command School, where she was the Franklin Kreml Leadership Award winner.

 

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Kris Henning

Kris Henning

Dr. Kris R. Henning is a professor and the chair of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Department at Portland State University. He joined the department in 2001. Dr. Henning’s recent research focuses on crime analysis, automated risk assessment, police communications, and directed patrol activities.
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Dr. Henning has extensive experience with applied research partnerships and consults regularly with a variety of criminal justice organizations. This includes service as an investigator on several federally sponsored collaborations, including the National Institute of Justice’s Strategic Approaches to Community Safety Initiative in Memphis, Tennessee, and Project Safe Neighborhoods with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Oregon; currently, he is the Principal Investigator for Portland’s Neighborhood Involvement Location project, funded through the Bureau of Justice Assistance Smart Policing Initiative.

 

In 1995, Dr. Henning earned his doctor of philosophy degree in clinical psychology from the University of Vermont.

 

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Kim Jacobs

Kim Jacobs

Chief Kim Jacobs entered the Columbus Division of Police in October 1979. This was only four years after the division first started training women to work in patrol. In 1987, she was promoted to sergeant and assigned to patrol and the Patrol Administrative office. Promoted to
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lieutenant in 1991, she was assigned to Patrol Zone 3 and as the Patrol Deputy Chief’s Administrative Staff Lieutenant. Chief Jacobs was the first woman in the division to be promoted to Commander in 1995, assigned to Communications, Internal Affairs, Patrol Zone 4, and the Training Bureau. She was promoted to Deputy Chief in 2009, assigned to the Patrol East Subdivision and the Patrol South Subdivision and then to the Administrative Subdivision. In 2012, she was promoted to Chief of Police.

 

As a field training officer, Chief Jacobs trained seven recruits and taught veterans in the new (at that time) intermediate weapon, the PR-24. Throughout her career, Chief Jacobs has been actively involved in numerous projects to improve operations and as an instructor at the division’s Academy for numerous supervisor development, in-service, and recruit classes. Among those accomplishments are her work in helping to set up and start the division’s Citizen Police Academy, the creation of a fifth radio talk group to reduce congestion on the radio, the creation of a separate domestic violence report when the new law went into effect, the complete reorganization of Internal Affairs to investigate all citizen complaints, the implementation of hands-on driver’s training during in-service training for the first time, serving as host for President Obama when he appeared at the graduation ceremony for the 114th recruit class, and in 2009 to 2010, putting together a new staffing and redistricting plan, which included adding two new precincts.

 

Chief Jacobs serves on the Board of Directors for the Center for Family Safety and Healing and the Board of Trustees for the Ohio Law Enforcement Foundation. She is a member of the United Way’s Women’s Leadership Council and Pride Council.

 

Chief Kim Jacobs holds a bachelor of arts degree in sociology from Ohio State University. She is a graduate of the Police Executive Leadership College and the Certified Law Enforcement Executive Program.

 

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Joanne Jaffe

Joanne Jaffe

Chief Joanne Jaffe is a 36-year veteran of the New York City Police Department (NYPD). She joined the NYPD in November 1979, after graduating from John Jay College of Criminal Justice in June 1979. Upon graduating from the police academy, she was assigned to a Neighborhood
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Stabilization Unit in Queens, New York, and then to the 75th Precinct in Brooklyn, New York. In July 1984, she was transferred to an investigative assignment within the Queens Narcotics Division of the Organized Crime Control Bureau.

 

In 1985, Officer Jaffe was promoted to sergeant and transferred to the 104th Precinct in Queens. A year later, she was selected to a supervisory position within the NYPD’s elite Street Crime Unit. After three years in the Street Crime Unit, Sergeant Jaffe was promoted to lieutenant and assigned to the 115th Precinct. During that time (in 1989), she was selected to attend the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. In 1991, Lieutenant Jaffe was reassigned to the Street Crime Unit.

 

In June 1993, Lieutenant Jaffe was promoted to captain and assigned to the Patrol Borough Manhattan South. She served as the Executive Officer of the 9th and 13th Precincts and Commanding Officer of three precincts: the 1st, 19th, and 33rd.

 

In June 1998, she was promoted to Assistant Chief and assigned as the Borough Commander of Patrol Borough Bronx. As an Assistant Chief, she also worked as Executive Officer of the Detective Bureau and Commanding Officer of the Office of Management, Analysis, and Planning.

 

In August 2003, Chief Jaffe was promoted to Chief of Housing, overseeing all police activities in the Housing Bureau, which consists of approximately 2,000 members of the service and over 600,000 residents.

 

In June 2008, she was selected to attend Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government Executive Education course and was awarded a certificate of completion from the Senior Executives in State and Local Government program.

 

In March 2014, Chief Jaffe was appointed by Police Commissioner William Bratton as Chief of the Community Affairs Bureau. As Chief of Community Affairs, she continues to serve the department and the citizens of New York City.

 

In 1984, Chief Jaffe earned a master’s degree in forensic psychology from John Jay College of Criminal Justice.

 

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Jennifer Joyce

Jennifer Joyce

As a life-long resident of the city of St. Louis, Jennifer M. Joyce’s desire to serve her community was inspired by her parents’ work as distinguished members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen. Ms. Joyce fundamentally believes that by engaging citizens in supporting a safe and vital community, we are more powerful together than any one of us can be alone.
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Ms. Joyce joined the Circuit Attorney’s Office as an Assistant Circuit Attorney in 1994 because of her sincere desire to be an active member in the thriving community she loves. By the time she was elected as Circuit Attorney in 2000, she had handled more than 700 felony cases, including rape, child abuse, assault, armed robbery, car theft, drug trafficking, and weapons offenses.

 

Ms. Joyce is serious about sending a clear message to those who choose to break the law and hurt innocent people. She has assembled a first-rate team of more than 145 professionals who are dedicated to keeping the people of the city of St. Louis safe. Under Ms. Joyce’s leadership as Circuit Attorney, more criminal offenders are being prosecuted than ever before.

 

Ms. Joyce’s staff is committed to the pursuit of justice under the laws of the state of Missouri, with the highest integrity in an open and transparent manner. They work to inspire confidence in the criminal justice system by leveraging resources to reduce the crime rate in the city of St. Louis, educating and engaging the community in keeping their neighborhoods safe, creating respectful and credible partnerships with all constituents, and attracting and retaining the top law professionals in the region.

 

Ms. Joyce serves on various boards, including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Backstoppers, the St. Louis Regional Crime Commission, and the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys. She is a member of the National District Attorneys Association, the Missouri Bar Association (served on the Board of Governors), the Illinois Bar Association, the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis, the Women Lawyers’ Association of Greater St. Louis, and the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys (served as President).

 

After graduating from St. Louis University School of Law in 1987, Ms. Joyce joined a private firm known today as Husch Blackwell.

 

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James Lynch

James Lynch

James P. Lynch is a professor and the chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Professor Lynch joined the department after serving as the director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics in the U.S. Department of Justice. Previously, he was a distinguished professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at John Jay College,
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City University of New York. He was a professor in the Department of Justice, Law, and Society at American University from 1986 to 2005 and chair of that department from 2003 to 2005.

 

Professor Lynch’s research focuses on victim surveys, victimization risk, the role of coercion in social control, and crime statistics. He has published four books and numerous articles, many of them dealing with crime statistics. He was vice president-elect of the American Society of Criminology and served on the Committee on Law and Justice Statistics of the American Statistical Association. From 2008 to 2010, Professor Lynch was coeditor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology.

 

Professor Lynch received doctor of philosophy and master of arts degrees in sociology from the University of Chicago and a bachelor of art’s degree from Wesleyan University.

 

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Chris Magnus

Chris Magnus

Chief Chris Magnus is the Chief of Police for the Tucson Police Department.

 

 

Kathleen O’Toole

Kathleen O’Toole

Kathleen O’Toole was sworn in as Chief of the Seattle, Washington, Police Department on June 23, 2014.

 

Chief O’Toole is a career police officer and lawyer who has earned an international reputation for her principled leadership and reform strategies.
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In 2012, Chief O’Toole completed a six-year term as Chief Inspector of the Garda Síochána Inspectorate, an oversight body responsible for bringing reform, best practice, and accountability to the 17,000-member Irish national police service.

 

Prior to serving in Ireland, Chief O’Toole rose through the ranks of local and state policing in the United States. During her police career, she was assigned to numerous patrol, investigative, undercover, supervisory, and management positions. She has served as Superintendent (Chief) of the Metropolitan District Commission Police and as Lieutenant Colonel in the Massachusetts State Police, overseeing special operations. She was later appointed Massachusetts Secretary of Public Safety in 1994 and Boston Police Commissioner in 2004.

 

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Sue Rahr

Sue Rahr

Sue Rahr joined the King County Sheriff’s Office as a patrol deputy in 1979 and for 25 years worked her way up through the ranks until she was elected Sheriff in 2005. She served as Sheriff for seven years, leading an agency of more than one thousand employees providing law
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enforcement services to over 500,000 people in 12 cities and the unincorporated neighborhoods of metropolitan Seattle.

 

As Executive Director of the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission since 2012 she is responsible for training all city and county law enforcement and corrections officers in the state. She is the architect of the cultural transformation of police training in Washington State “From Warriors to Guardians” described in the paper referenced below.

 

She has served on many community and professional boards and organizations including:

  • President - Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs
  • Executive Board - National Sheriffs Association
  • The “Executive Session on Policing” at the Harvard Kennedy School.” (As a member she co-authored a paper titled, “From Warriors to Guardians – Recommitting American Law Enforcement to Democratic Ideals” – Published April 2015) Executive Fellow – “The Police Foundation”
  • The “President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing”

 

She graduated Cum Laude from Washington State University (1979) and is a graduate of the National Sheriff’s Institute and the FBI National Executive Institute.

 

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Vincent Talucci

Vincent Talucci

Vincent Talucci currently serves as the Executive Director for the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), an organization with over 21,000 members from over 100 countries around the world. As the Executive Director, Mr. Talucci is responsible for ensuring that the
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IACP builds upon over a century of success addressing issues at the forefront of the law enforcement profession, to include, advocacy, training, technical assistance and exchange of information. Leading a staff of over 100 professionals, Mr. Talucci provides strategic advice and counsel to the IACP leadership and membership on the critical issues they confront each day. Prior to his present appointment, Mr. Talucci was Deputy Executive Director, Director of IACP’s Programs and Research Activities Directorate, and oversaw a broad range of core association services: police operations and management evaluations; promotional testing; executive search and placement; and oversight of federally-sponsored efforts including the National Law Enforcement Model Policy Center, Discover Policing, and IACP Center for Social Media. From 2010 to 2012, Mr. Talucci served as Principal Advisor for Law Enforcement, State and Local Government Practice, with SAS, a worldwide software industry leader in predictive analytics and information integration services. From 2002 to 2010, Mr. Talucci served with the IACP, progressing to Director of the Division of State and Provincial Police (S&P), facilitating the efforts of the S&P Executive Committee, forging strategic directions to address critical issues facing state and provincial law enforcement, and leading efforts in information sharing, homeland security, traffic safety, and innovative technology. Before joining IACP, Mr. Talucci worked with the National Institute of Justice, USDOJ, where his responsibilities included the substantive and programmatic management of criminal justice initiatives. Mr. Talucci completed his undergraduate work at Rutgers University and holds a Master's degree in Public Administration from the University of Washington

 

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